FAQ

If you cannot find the answer you are looking for, simply contact us.

General

What qualifies as a warranty?

G3’s warranty covers defects in material or workmanship and does not cover damage from wear and tear, neglect or abuse. Claims must be submitted within the given warranty period. Review the G3 Warranty Policy for more information.

*Skin glue contamination in the form of heat, UV, chemical or particulate contamination is not a warranty issue, however you can find tips here on how to properly care for and prolong the life of G3 climbing skins.

How do I submit a warranty claim?

Contact the point of purchase for all warranty claims (bricks and mortar stores or online retailers) they can help you with advice, service and processing of warranty claims. If this is not possible G3 can process the claim however proof of purchase is necessary and the item must fall within the warranty period. To submit claims please use our warranty form.

Where can I purchase G3 products?

G3 products can be purchased through authorized G3 dealers both online and at bricks and mortar locations. Use our dealer locator to find a location near you. G3 products can be also purchased directly using the G3 online warehouse.

I love G3, where can I get some G3 stickers?

If you reside in North America send us a stamped self addressed envelope to us at the appropriate address below and we will send you some stickers!

In Canada
Stickers
C/O G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc.
200 Donaghy Avenue
North Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada, V7P 2L5

In the United States
Stickers
G3 Genuine Guide Gear Inc.
c/o Door A37
1201 C Street NW
Auburn, WA, USA
98001

Skins

What length of Alpinist skins fit my skis?

All Alpinist style skins come fit to length and have the fit range on the box. The size range specified by G3 fits most skis, however due to variation in reported skin lengths we cannot guarantee the fit. If possible line up the skins prior to taking the Mylar off the glue and ensure you have the best fit. If you for some reason have purchased the wrong length bring it back to the point of purchase to exchange it for the optimal size.

Check out the sizing chart for length specifications.

What width of skin should I use?

With parabolic (shaped) ski designs it is sometimes confusing trying to decide what width of skins is optimal for a given ski. Most often one will find the 3 main dimensions for a ski: tip width, waist width and tail width. One usually does not need full coverage at the tip as very little traction comes from this area. Choosing a skin width which matches the tail width of one’s ski is often the most economical and efficient choice. If you prefer more glide you can go with a more narrow skin which may not need to be trimmed. An added benefit here is that he skins will fold up nicely and help prevent contamination from exposed glue. If one wants to maximize traction you may choose slightly wider skin.

My skin glue is getting old and the glue is contaminated what can I do?

Climbing skins will last a very long time when they are properly taken care of. In time glue can become contaminated and less effective. In time you may choose to re-glue your skins, this will give extend the life of your skins and ensure optimal performance.

How do I re-glue my skins?

Applying a fresh coat of glue onto your climbing skins will give your skins a renewed lifecycle. This can be done fairly easily with a few basic tools and some TLC. Tools required will be a waxing iron, scraper (dry wall scrapers work well), brown paper or a rag, some scrap card board and if possible 2 clamps and a heat gun. Find a work bench or table in a well ventilated area to do the job.

  1. Remove all glue by applying heat and scraping off the glue, this can also be done by heating the glue through a contact sheet (such as thick paper or a rag) and pulling it off.
  2. Once all glue is removed let the skins dry completely and ensure you have a clean fabric surface with no residual contaminated glue
  3. You can now apply the G3 Glue renew sheets (which also have detailed instructions within).
  4. Peel off the protective covering and apply the glue side down onto the skin fabric (not the plush side of course).
  5. Apply smooth and continual force and heat using your iron to adhere all of the glue onto the skins.
  6. When you have applied sufficient heat and pressure to the entire skin than you can let it sit and cool.
  7. Once the glue has cooled use a sharp hobby knife to trace the skins and cut away the excess glue/paper
  8. Gently remove the paper covering
How do I confirm what year my G3 Climbing Skins were manufactured?

G3 climbing skins have a 4-digit number stamped on to the flexible tail of the skins. This number contains 3 codes:

  • First digit is the year of production – 0 = 2010, 1 = 2011, 2 = 2012 etc.
  • The next 2 digits are the week of that year that the skins were manufactured.
  • The fourth digit is the length of the skins – 1 = x-short, 2 = short, 3 = medium, 4 = long and 5 = x-long.

Thus serial number “3014” would be a skin manufactured in the first week of 2013 that is ‘long’.

Why does spring snow stick to my G3 Climbing Skins?

G3 Mohair-mix climbing skins are best suited for cold dry conditions. Use of these specific skins in Coastal warm wet conditions will often result in snow sticking to your skins. Once wet it is difficult to prevent snow clumping to your skins. G3 recommends Alpinist or Expedition skins for these conditions. Pre-treating the skin fabric with a proofing agent such as Glop Stopper Wax or Nikwax Ski Skin Proof can help in these conditions, if you do not have access to these products try a tea light!

Why do my G3 Climbing Skins sometimes fail to grip the skin track?

Skin tracks provide the most traction when they are first established – those hardy souls breaking trail and those immediately following. Even those skiers 4 places back in the line may find less traction available to them. Pulling fresh snow on to the skin track using your ski pole can help. However, there are limits to the traction that skins can provide on a skin track. Split boarders with shorter, wider boards using High-Traction skins can create very steep skin tracks that others cannot easily follow. Older skin tracks that have frozen overnight are notoriously slippery. Uneven terrain may be passable for the first couple of climbers, then become too steep for the later climbers to attain grip. As skin tracks become steeper, climbers tend to move more weight to their toes, as if using crampons. This will cause the heel to slip, and may result in a hard fall on to one’s face as the skin grip fails and the weighted leg slips backward. Use your climbing heels to maintain a level boot sole, and maintain weight on the heel of your boot. If you cannot grip an established skin track, re-set a new one at a more manageable grade.

For more information about climbing skins and technique check out this information from MEC or this Telemark Ski article.

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